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Genetics/SNPs


Genetic Testing &

Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

 

The human genome is a string of over 3 billion chemical letters that spell out every inherited trait. Although the letters of all our genomes are virtually identical and have little variation, more and more frequently, nature gets a letter wrong, similar to a typo. Scientists call these genetic misspellings SNPs (snips), or single nucleotide polymorphisms, which occur as variations at a single site in DNA. In fact, an SNP is the most frequent variation in the human genome with about 5-10 million of them. Although not all of these disparities contribute to disease. Scientists are now using them to diagnose medical disorders, craft superior medications, and tailor treatment regimens that circumvent such mutations. We will be utilizing Dr. Amy Yasko's biomolecular nutrigenomics protocol, which addresses a multitude of disorders including ADD/ADHD, autism spectrum, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, and myriad neurological and autoimmune disorders.

Most would agree that it is important to address all of the contributing factors that lead to disease. Yet how do we manage the interplay between genes, environmental triggers, and infectious disease?  One definitive way is to evaluate the genetic contribution of disease with advanced technologies. Genetic testing offers a way to evaluate and address the inherited components of multifactorial disease. Fortunately, testing is widely available to identify a number of underlying weaknesses and mutations throughout the DNA. A number of leading universities, biotechnology, and pharmaceutical companies are studying nutrigenomics in order to apply this information for more targeted treatments. For instance, this science reveals which patients might respond well or poorly to the statin drugs, used in lowering cholesterol. Many prominent scientists such as Dr. Bruce Ames (one of the world's most renowned molecular biologists) is conducting ongoing research in order to present a comprehensive map of the genetic differences that help explain why we vary in health, appearance and even behavior.


For the first time in history, we have a personalized; genetics based medicine that offers a solution for the millions who suffer from chronic, often unexplainable, diseases and disorders. This field opens many doors and provides an exciting opportunity for those who seek an alternative to merely treating the symptoms. It also provides the most comprehensive approach to date in that it encompasses the genetic foundations, a host of environmental exposures, and many individual risk factors as well as the consequences. As nutrigenomics expands and more specialists begin utilizing this medicine in their own clinical practices, we will finally realize the dream of personalized medicine for everyone. In the meantime, we look forward to sharing this extraordinary path to healing with you!

References

 

Chaney, S. Nutrigenomics, The future of Nutrition. Textbook of biochemistry. 7th Ed., 2011 1094-1095.

Casci T. Genetics: SNPs that come in threes. 2010 Jan;11(1):8. Nat Gen Res.

Chauhan, A., Chauhan, V., & Brown, T. W., Autism: Oxidative stress, inflammation, and immune abnormalities. 2010.

Gray, I.C., Campbell, D.A., Spurr, N.K. Single nucleotide polymorphisms as tools in human genetics. Hum Mol Genet. 2000 Oct;9(16):2403-8.

Kaput, J, & Rodriguez, R.L., Nutritional Genomics: discovering the path to personalized nutrition. 2006.

Nathan, N. On hope and healing: For those who have fallen through the medical cracks. 2010.   

Payseur, B.A., Cutter, A.D. Integrating patterns of polymorphism at SNPs and STRs. Trends Genet. 2006 Aug;22(8):424-9.

Shaw, W. Biological treatments for autism and PDD. 2008.

Soslau, G. Single-strand conformation polymorphism. Textbook of biochemistry, 7thEd., 2011, 270-274.

Wakeley, J., Nielsen, R., Liu-Cordero, S.N., Ardlie, K. The discovery of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and inferences about human demographic history. Am J Hum Genet. 2001 Dec;69(6):1332-47.

Yasko, A. Biomolecular nutrigenomic analysis of the methylation cycle. A Synopsis of Genetic Bypass. 2004.

 

Yasko, A. Autism: Pathway to Recovery. 2009.

 

Zhang, Y. Functional genetic variants and mental disorders: Single nucleotide polymorphisms and their effects in genes involved in mental disorders. 2009.


References

 

Chaney, S. Nutrigenomics, The future of Nutrition. Textbook of biochemistry. 7th Ed., 2011 1094-1095.

Casci T. Genetics: SNPs that come in threes. 2010 Jan;11(1):8. Nat Gen Res.

Chauhan, A., Chauhan, V., & Brown, T. W., Autism: Oxidative stress, inflammation, and immune abnormalities. 2010.

Gray, I.C., Campbell, D.A., Spurr, N.K. Single nucleotide polymorphisms as tools in human genetics. Hum Mol Genet. 2000 Oct;9(16):2403-8.

Kaput, J, & Rodriguez, R.L., Nutritional Genomics: discovering the path to personalized nutrition. 2006.

Nathan, N. On hope and healing: For those who have fallen through the medical cracks. 2010.   

Payseur, B.A., Cutter, A.D. Integrating patterns of polymorphism at SNPs and STRs. Trends Genet. 2006 Aug;22(8):424-9.

Shaw, W. Biological treatments for autism and PDD. 2008.

Soslau, G. Single-strand conformation polymorphism. Textbook of biochemistry, 7thEd., 2011, 270-274.

Wakeley, J., Nielsen, R., Liu-Cordero, S.N., Ardlie, K. The discovery of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and inferences about human demographic history. Am J Hum Genet. 2001 Dec;69(6):1332-47.

Yasko, A. Biomolecular nutrigenomic analysis of the methylation cycle. A Synopsis of Genetic Bypass. 2004.

 

Yasko, A. Autism: Pathway to Recovery. 2009.

 

Zhang, Y. Functional genetic variants and mental disorders: Single nucleotide polymorphisms and their effects in genes involved in mental disorders. 2009.